Book Reviews

This page contains Book Reviews that I have authored.

Reviews of my books are included on each Book page.


Fulgentius and the Sythian Monks

McGregor and Fairbairn provide English translations of three treatises of Fulgentius of Ruspe (d. 533) for the first time: Epistle 17, Epistle 15, and The Truth about Predestination and Grace. This contribution adds to Robert Eno‘s translations of selected works of Fulgentius in Fathers of the Church 95. Now all of Fulgentius‘s major anti-Pelagian works are in English.

Fulgentius and the Scythian Monks, Correspondence on Christology and Grace. Translated by Rob Roy MeGregor and Donald Fairbairn. Introduction and Notes by Donald Fairbairn. Fathers of the Church 126. Washington. DC: Catholic University ofAmerica Press, 2013. xv + 251 pages.

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Apocalyptic Thought in Early Christianity

Fifteen scholars of early Christianity and art history contributed essays for this rich compilation of new research in patristic eschatology. The studies mainly focus upon communities and texts from Eastern Christianity.

Apocalyptic Thought in Early Christianity, Daly, Robert J., editor. Holy Cross Studies in Patristic Theology and History, Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2009 Pp. 303.

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Martyrdom from Exegesis in Hippolytus: An Early Church Presbyter’s Commentary on Daniel

Shelton’s thesis is that Hippolytus, one of the first Christian authors of a continuous commentary on one book of Scripture, wrote the Commentary on Daniel to encourage his readers or auditors to patiently and bravely endure persecution even to the point of martyrdom.

Martyrdom from Exegesis in Hippolytus: An Early Church Presbyter’s Commentary on Daniel by W. Brian Shelton. Studies in Christian History and Thought. Milton Keynes, UK: Paternoster, 2008, xiv + 178. £19.99, paper.

Download the review of Shelton’s book on Hippolytus in PDF form.


Nerses of Lambron-Commentary on the Revelation of St. John

Nerses’ commentary, here translated from the Armenian language into English for the first time, is a twelfth-century adaptation of the Greek commentary on the Apocalypse of Andrew of Caesarea in Cappadocia composed in the seventh century. Nerses picked and chose from Andrew what he wanted to include and exclude, and often added his own commentary.

Nerses of Lambron. Commentary on the Revelation of Saint John. Translation of the Armenian Text, Notes, and Introduction by Robert W. Thomson. Hebrew University Armenian Studies 9. Lueven: Peeters, 2007. xi + 225 pages. $63.

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Not Without Us: A Brief History of the Forgotten Catholic Doctrine of Predestination During the Semipelagian Controversy

In this review I shall provide an overview of the contents of the book including its purpose and conclusions, interact with its scholarship, and draw attention to its contributions to the study of the historical development of the doctrine of predestination.

Guido Stucco. Not Without Us: A Brief History of the Forgotten Catholic Doctrine of Predestination During the Semipelagian Controversy. Tuscon, AZ: Fenestra Books, 2006. 294 pp. Paper. ISBN: 1-58736-533-2. $21.95.

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Tyconius’ Exposition of the Apocalypse

For decades scholars of early Christianity have awaited a reconstruction of Tyconius’ Expositio Apocalypseos (Exposition of the Apocalypse). Tyconius wrote it about 380 AD, but it did not survive in its entirety. Two fragments of it were found in Budapest and Turin, but they were incomplete and one shows evidence of interpolation. However, so many early medieval commentators on John’s Apocalypse made use of it, that patristic scholars believed that a fairly complete reconstruction was possible. Roger Gryson did just that in Vol. 107A of Corpus Christianorum Series Latina (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011)

Roger Gryson, ed., Tyconii Afri Expositio Apocalypseos. Corpus Christianorum Series Latina 107A. Turnhout: Brepols, 2011. Pp. 386. $341, cloth.

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Review of The Westminster Handbook to Medieval Theology

Before reviewing the contents and merits of this handbook, I would first like to introduce its author. Dr. Ginther teaches medieval theology at my alma mater, Saint Louis University, and serves as the director of graduate students in its theology department. An expert on the medieval theologian, Robert Grosseteste, Ginther loves to work with medieval texts, including biblical commentaries, and recently directed a dissertation on medieval Apocalypse commentaries.

Kerux 25:3 (Dec 2010):43-45. James R. Ginther. The Westminster Handbook to Medieval Theology. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2009. xxxi + 207 pages. $39.95.

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